• Revenue Cycle Management
  • COVID-19
  • Reimbursement
  • Diabetes Awareness Month
  • Risk Management
  • Patient Retention
  • Staffing
  • Medical Economics® 100th Anniversary
  • Coding and documentation
  • Business of Endocrinology
  • Telehealth
  • Physicians Financial News
  • Cybersecurity
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Locum Tenens, brought to you by LocumLife®
  • Weight Management
  • Business of Women's Health
  • Practice Efficiency
  • Finance and Wealth
  • EHRs
  • Remote Patient Monitoring
  • Sponsored Webinars
  • Medical Technology
  • Billing and collections
  • Acute Pain Management
  • Exclusive Content
  • Value-based Care
  • Business of Pediatrics
  • Concierge Medicine 2.0 by Castle Connolly Private Health Partners
  • Practice Growth
  • Concierge Medicine
  • Business of Cardiology
  • Implementing the Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Malpractice
  • Influenza
  • Sexual Health
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Technology
  • Legal and Policy
  • Money
  • Opinion
  • Vaccines
  • Practice Management
  • Patient Relations
  • Careers

High-tech handwashing system could help reduce hospital infections

Article

Testing of a hand hygiene program using infrared and radio frequency identification technology to capture and time-stamp hand washings is underway at a Miami hospital.

Testing of a hand hygiene program using infrared and radio frequency identification technology to capture and time-stamp hand washings is underway at The University of Miami and the Center for Patient Safety at the Jackson Memorial Hospital.

The tests are being done to see if the technology can help reduce hospital-acquired infections. The infrared (IR) and radio frequency (RF) technology is from Versus Technology, which is combined with systems integration services from Dynamic Computer Corp.

The program is able to capture who is washing their hands, when they wash them and where the washing occurred with IR-RF sensors in soap dispensing units. The sensors read staff identification badges and monitor the location and timing of hand washing, according to the Center for Patient Safety.

The technology would then allow hospitals to track and report on hand washing compliance, and identify problem areas that require additional training. The system would alert staff members in real time if they forget to wash their hands. Initial tests are being done at the safety center, and pilot testing in a hospital setting will follow.

Related Videos
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health