• Revenue Cycle Management
  • COVID-19
  • Reimbursement
  • Diabetes Awareness Month
  • Risk Management
  • Patient Retention
  • Staffing
  • Medical Economics® 100th Anniversary
  • Coding and documentation
  • Business of Endocrinology
  • Telehealth
  • Physicians Financial News
  • Cybersecurity
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Locum Tenens, brought to you by LocumLife®
  • Weight Management
  • Business of Women's Health
  • Practice Efficiency
  • Finance and Wealth
  • EHRs
  • Remote Patient Monitoring
  • Sponsored Webinars
  • Medical Technology
  • Billing and collections
  • Acute Pain Management
  • Exclusive Content
  • Value-based Care
  • Business of Pediatrics
  • Concierge Medicine 2.0 by Castle Connolly Private Health Partners
  • Practice Growth
  • Concierge Medicine
  • Business of Cardiology
  • Implementing the Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Malpractice
  • Influenza
  • Sexual Health
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Technology
  • Legal and Policy
  • Money
  • Opinion
  • Vaccines
  • Practice Management
  • Patient Relations
  • Careers

Cultural Competency: Same doctors, different outcomes

Article

The disparity in medical outcomes between black and white patients is largely because minorities have poorer access to high-quality care, according to conventional wisdom. How, then, to explain a new study that found such disparities between white and minority patients who went to the same physicians?

The disparity in medical outcomes between black and white patients is largely because minorities have poorer access to high-quality care, according to conventional wisdom. How, then, to explain a new study that found such disparities between white and minority patients who went to the same physicians?

The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, focused on patients with diabetes. In one key measure of outcomes-HbA1c-71 percent of whites but only 63 percent of blacks were at the desired level.

The problem isn't that the doctors are treating blacks and whites differently, the lead author told The New York Times. It's that they're using a "one-size-fits-all approach" when they should be tailoring care to patients' cultural and individual differences.

Related Videos
Mike Bannon - ©CSG Partners