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Weight loss, exercise help people with diabetes remain mobile

Article

Persuading your patients with type 2 diabetes to lose weight and exercise more can help them stay mobile longer, according to a new study.

Persuading your patients with type 2 diabetes to lose weight and exercise more can help them stay mobile longer, according to a new study. The 4-year clinical trial examined the effects of intentional weight loss on the risk of developing cardiovascular disease in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes.

Patients were assigned either to a group that promoted weight loss through diet and exercise or to a group that provided general education on diet, activity, and social support. The intervention group reported less mobility-related disability and more good mobility than the support and education group.

"This study highlights the value of finding ways to help adults with type 2 diabetes keep moving as they age. We know that when adults lose mobility, it becomes difficult for them to live on their own, and they are likely to develop more serious health problems," says Mary Evans, PhD, project scientist for the study.

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