U.S. health system ranks last overall

August 6, 2010

The United States ranks last overall compared to six other industrialized countries on measures of health system performance in five areas, including quality and efficiency.

The United States ranks last overall compared to six other industrialized countries-Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom-on measures of health system performance in five areas: quality, efficiency, access to care, equity, and the ability to lead long, healthy, productive lives, according to a Commonwealth Fund report.

The United States ranks last in value despite spending $7,290 per capita on healthcare in 2007 compared to the $3,837 spent per capita in the Netherlands, which ranked first overall, according to the report.

On two of four quality measures-effective care and patient-centered care-the United States ranks fourth. However, the United States ranks last when it comes to providing safe care, and next-to-last on coordinated care. American patients with chronic conditions are the most likely to report being given the wrong medication, the wrong dose, and a delayed abnormal test result.