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TIA doubles risk of MI; highest risk is in those younger than 60

Article

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) doubles the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), and this increase in risk persists for several years. Some 456 patients (Mean age: 71 years) who were identified from a medical records database (Rochester Epidemiology Project) as having been diagnosed with a TIA between 1985 and 1994 were followed for a median of 10.2 years.

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) doubles the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), and this increase in risk persists for several years. Some 456 patients (Mean age: 71 years) who were identified from a medical records database (Rochester Epidemiology Project) as having been diagnosed with a TIA between 1985 and 1994 were followed for a median of 10.2 years. Researcher cross-referenced this information with data on MI occurring within this patient group through 2006. The risk of MI among TIA patients was about 1% per year, which is about twice that of the general population. The increased risk persisted over at least 20 years and was most pronounced among patients younger than 60 years, who were 15 times more likely than non-TIA patients to have an MI. The average length of time between a first TIA and an MI was 5 years.

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© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
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© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health