Survey shows traits of better practices

February 10, 2011

Common characteristics of better-performing medical practices include comparing individual performance to internal and external peers, employing midlevels, and ensuring efficient patient flow through the practice, according to an MGMA report.

Common characteristics of better-performing medical practices include comparing individual performance to internal and external peers, employing midlevels, and ensuring efficient patient flow through the practice, according to a recent report from the Medical Group Management Association.

Better-performing groups were ranked in four categories: profitability and cost management; productivity, capacity and staffing; accounts receivable and collections; and patient satisfaction.

Better performing practices use formal surveys to gauge patients' satisfaction with their practices. More than 30% of these practices benchmark the survey results to other practices, and more than 60% educate physicians about behavior.