Study: Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine less effective against Delta

A new study claims the single-dose vaccine is less effective against emerging variants than previously believed.

The Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine may be less effective against emerging variants than previously believed.

According to a new study which has not yet been peer-reviewed, patients who received the single-dose vaccine showed antibodies with low neutralizing titer compared to the modest neutralization titers found in those who received Pfizer and Moderna’s two-jab regimens. Patients who received the one-shot vaccine may be served by receiving a second dose, ideally one of the two mRNA vaccines.

As reported by The New York Times, this study was based on experiments conducted with blood samples and may not be indicative of the vaccine’s efficacy in the real world, but it does contradict the conclusions from smaller studies published by Johnson and Johnson earlier in July which suggested a single dose is effective against the variant eight months after vaccination.

The Times spoke to multiple virologists who recommended a second dose of the Johnson and Johnson or a booster of one of the mRNA vaccines.

This is just another bump in the road for the Johnson and Johnson vaccine, once touted as a savior of the country due to its single dose and relative ease in shipping compared to the two mRNA options.

After being the last American COVID-19 vaccine to receive authorization, the federal government soon cast a pall over the vaccine in mid-April by implementing a pause on the administration of the vaccine due to an extremely rare side effect.

The vaccine was connected to six women between the ages of 18 and 48 who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis along with low levels of blood platelets six to 13 days after receiving the Johnson and Johnson vaccination.

About 11 days later the government lifted the pause, but the damage was already done as a poll from the Washington Post and ABC performed just before the pause was lifted found that less than 25 percent of unvaccinated Americans were willing to receive the Johnson and Johnson.