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Research group wants payment reporting exemption

Article

Researching drugs not yet approved for sale should exempt you from new payment reporting requirements, says the Association of Clinical Research Organizations (ACRO).

Researching drugs not yet approved for sale should exempt you from new payment reporting requirements, says the Association of Clinical Research Organizations (ACRO).

The Physician Payments Sunshine Act requires the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to publish payments and "transfers of value" from group purchasing organizations and drug, device, biologic, and medical supply manufacturers to physicians and teaching hospitals. ACRO wants to exempt payments regarding drugs the Food and Drug Administration has not yet approved.

"The reporting requirements for 'research' would be so burdensome ... that the costs would far exceed any public benefit that we can see," said Doug Peddicord, ACRO executive director. He cited a 2010 survey of researchers who conduct clinical trials that found that 24% would be less likely or would not participate in research if their incomes were disclosed.

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