ACP to study quality outcomes related to diabetes, cardio care

March 25, 2013

A pilot to test the effects of a technology-based quality improvement program on physician participation, value to practices, rapid-cycle learning, and patient outcomes has been launched by the American College of Physicians.

A pilot to test the effects of a technology-based quality improvement program on physician participation, value to practices, rapid-cycle learning, and patient outcomes has been launched by the American College of Physicians (ACP) in collaboration with CECity, developer of a social, cloud-based performance improvement platform called MedConcert.

The 1-year pilot program, “Improving the Quality of Diabetes Care,” will tailor MedConcert with diabetes and cardiovascular disease prevention content.

“This initiative will provide important data to help us determine the feasibility of recruiting physician offices to participate in an integrated, technology-based quality improvement program,” says Michael S. Barr, MD, MBA, FACP, senior vice president of ACP’s medical practice, professionalism, and quality division.

Up to 50 internal medicine practices in three states will have access to the following Web-based tools:

  • the ACP diabetes registry based on the 2013 Physician Quality Reporting System Diabetes Measure Group and related data elements;

  • patient surveys to provide feedback on system and provider performance, including information about coordination of care; and

  • the ACP’s Medical Home Builder 2.0, which provides practice teams with a self-assessment tool designed to to improve patient care, streamline fundamental business operations, and implement key features of the Patient-Centered Medical Home.

A report on the results of the pilot program is expected by the end of the year.