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The 20 worst residency programs for producing primary care physicians

Article

What immediately jumps out about the list of residency programs that produce the lowest percentage of primary care graduates is that it includes some of the biggest names in healthcare: Cleveland Clinic, Johns Hopkins, Brigham and Women's and plenty of others.

Last month we brought you the 20 best medical institutions when it comes to producing primary care graduates.

This month we set our sights a bit lower - OK, a lot lower: The 20 worst residency programs, as ranked by percentage of primary care graduates.

What immediately jumps out about this list is that some of the best hospitals are the worst, as The Atlantic so aptly phrased it.

That is to say, the list of the bottom producers of primary care graduates includes some of the most prestigious and highly regarded hospitals in the nation: Cleveland Clinic, Johns Hopkins, Brigham and Women's, Massachusetts General and plenty of high-profile names.

Once again, the data encapsulates the years from 2006 to 2008, and applies to the 161 institutions with more than 200 graduates during those years. The data was obtained from a recent study in Academic Medicinethat discusses the need to hold GME-sponsoring institutions accountable for developing America's future primary care physicians.

161. Washington University
St. Louis, MO
1,038
6.4%
160. Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, MA
848
6.5%
159. Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston, MA
893
7.7%
158. Stanford Hospital
Palo Alto, CA
781
8.3%
157. Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville, TN
793
8.5%
156. Temple University Hospital
Philadelphia, PA
484
8.5%
155. Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Cleveland, OH
752
8.5%
154. New York Presbyterian Hospital
New York, NY
1,599
8.6%
153. University of Pennsylvania Health System
Philadelphia, PA
898
8.8%
152. Duke University Hospital
Durham, NC
861
8.9%
151. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, MD
1,148
9%
150. Naval Medical Center
San Diego, CA
256
9%
149. University Hospital Inc.
Cincinnati, OH
485
9.1%
148. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Boston, MA
631
9.2%
147. Ochsner Clinc Foundation
New Orleans, LA
215
9.3%
146. Children's Hospital
Boston, MA
423
9.7%
145. Yale-New Haven Hospital
New Haven, CT
865
9.7%
144. Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
Philadelphia, PA
705
9.9%
143. University of Texas Southwestern Medical School
Dallas, TX
1,157
10%
142. Henry Ford Hospital
Detroit, MI
591
10.2%

 

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