Primary care physician shortage will hit hardest in California

November 10, 2013

California could be facing the most severe shortage of primary care physicians in the next 17 years, according to a study by the Robert Graham Center.

 

California could be facing the most severe shortage of primary care physicians (PCPs) in the next 17 years, according to a study by the Robert Graham Center. The state might need 8,243 more PCPs by 2030-that’s 32% of its current workforce.

The study finds that the aging population, population growth and more patients due to the Affordable Care Act are driving the increased need in PCPs.

The Robert Graham Center suggest that education reform that includes medical school debt relief, increased primary care training, and reimbursement reform to attract more physicians to the primary care field.

As of 2010, California has more than 25,000 PCPs. The state’s current population to PCP ratio of 1483:1 is greater than the national average of 1463:1.

Source: The Robert Graham Center

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