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Morning Medical Update: Teens turning to drastic measures to lose weight; Alzheimer’s in the gut; Patients less likely to buy generic after bad news

Article

The top news stories in primary care today.

doctor morning coffee desk © Alena Kryazheva - stock.adobe.com

© Alena Kryazheva - stock.adobe.com

Teens turning to drastic measures to lose weight

Obese young people are taking more drastic measures to lose weight. In January, obesity drug Wegovy was approved for children 12 and under. At the same time, the American Academy of Pediatrics proposed guidelines for weight loss surgery in children as young as 13. According to the article, “80% of adolescents with excess weight will carry it into adulthood.”

Alzheimer’s in the gut

A new study found that people with early Alzheimer’s have alterations in their gut bacteria. It’s unclear which affects which though. More research is needed to identify which of the gut bacteria is detrimental and if it can be used to reverse Alzheimer’s. This is just the latest in the research about gut microbiomes and other health conditions such as Parkinson’s and heart disease.

Patients less likely to buy generic after bad news

Patients are less likely to buy generic drugs after receiving bad news about their health, according to a recent Johns Hopkins University study. According to the study, “this could result in 3% more total drug expenditures per patient.” Generics have the same therapeutic value and cost 80% less than the name brand. Physicians are encouraged to recommend generic medications to patients.

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© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health