Med School Graduates are Getting Recruited Earlier

Health care organizations are stepping it up when recruiting newly trained physicians. Since physician demand will only increase with the 2014 implementation of health care reform, recruiters need to act earlier than ever.

Health care organizations are stepping it up when recruiting newly trained physicians. More members of the class of 2013 signed contracts months before they graduated, according to a new survey.

According to Cejka Search, the challenge of gaining a competitive edge to recruit new physicians will only intensify when health care reform is implemented in 2014. More than half (52%) of 2013 graduates had signed contract by March, compared with 31% of the class of 2012.

“The rise of physician employment, integration of medical practices and change in reimbursement structures will continue to pressure health care organizations to find the best talent who fit their organizations,” Lori Schutte, president of Cejka Search, said in a statement. “Physician recruiters must take strategic action — early — in order to recruit the top physicians emerging from training.”

Respondents to the Residents and Fellows Survey also revealed that a majority of 2014 graduates will be looking early. They plan to look at opportunities at by the end of this summer and start interviewing before the year ends. The majority (61%) of 2013 graduates had begun interviewing prior to January 2013.

The survey also provides insights into decision-making factors, such as interests, needs and motivations of the new physicians.

Family needs and personal ties are the most important influence on which job new physicians choose. Three-quarters said proximity to family is a factor and 67% said their choices are dependent on the interests of someone else, like a spouse, significant other or family member.

Cejka’s survey also revealed that more physicians are choosing rural communities. Nearly a quarter chose rural as their preferred choice, which is a 16% increase over the previous year.