7 Must-See Sights in Hong Kong

When foreigners picture Hong Kong, it's often the neon lights, staggering skyscrapers, and hoards of people. This all may be true, but this city is home to just as much old as new.

This article is slightly edited and published with permission from Oyster Blog.

When foreigners picture Hong Kong, it’s often the neon lights, staggering skyscrapers, and hoards of people. This all may be true, but this city is home to just as much old as new: historic temples cozy up to massive modern buildings, and while the super-efficient subway rambles down below, quaint-looking trams above take locals and tourists on more scenic rides.

Be careful where you stay, though, as you could easily have one of the worst hotel room views or a hotel room with some of the coolest technology.

Explore the best Hong Kong has to offer, as we take a look at some of the city’s must-see sights!

Victoria Harbour

With a beautiful setting on the water, the Victoria Harbour has gorgeous views that look out to Victoria Peak, the tallest spot in the city.

International Finance Centre

The International Finance Centre is the largest building in Hong Kong. It is considered the "new heart of Hong Kong" and has a movie theater and luxury shopping center.

Statue Square

The popular pedestrian area is all reclaimed land and is home to statues honoring members of the Royal Family from the former mother country of England.

Kowloon Park

In addition to its animal inhabitants, the gorgeous Kowloon Park offers tree walks, sporting facilities, a Chinese Garden and an aviary.

Hong Kong Cultural Centre

The stunning Cultural Centre has tons going on, from exhibits and galleries, to one-of-a-kind performances.

Tsim Sha Tsui Clock Tower

The former Kowloon-Canton Railway terminal is a Hong Kong landmark standing at 44 meters (or 144 feet) tall. The clock tower was part of the first Kowloon railway station, and is the only piece of the terminus remaining at its original site.

Monument to the Glorious Dead

This monument serves as a reminder of the lives lost throughout World War II, which were numerous as China was already at war with Japan when the global hostilities began; the monument was initially erected after the First World War. The Cenotaph is located outside City Hall.