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Spider venom could help with erectile dysfunction; New blood test for sepsis; Experimental nasal spray for rapid heartbeat - Morning Medical Update

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The top news stories in primary care today.

doctor morning desk © Alena Kryazheva - stock.adobe.com

doctor morning desk © Alena Kryazheva - stock.adobe.com

Spider venom could help with erectile dysfunction

Scientists are now using spider venom to treat erectile dysfunction. The spider of interest is the Brazilian wandering spider (also known as the banana spider) because its venom causes long-lasting, painful erections. Trials show there are no negative side effects of using the venom this way.

New blood test for sepsis

A new test called the IntelliSep test quickly identifies if patients have sepsis. Trials show a 95% survival rate, with a cost of less than $4,000 a patient. It is more successful than other methods, which include monitoring procalcitonin levels.

Experimental nasal spray for rapid heartbeat

A new nasal spray that may allow patients to instantly treat their rapid heartbeat may soon be available. It is currently awaiting approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Nearly 1 in 300 people in the United States suffer from rapid heartbeat.

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© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health