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Morning Medical Update: Wildfire smoke can cause more than 9,000 deaths yearly; First AI generated drug enters human trials; Your shopping cart may someday gauge your heart health

Article

The top news stories in primary care today.

doctor desk morning coffee © Alena Kryazheva - stock.adobe.com

© Alena Kryazheva - stock.adobe.com

Wildfire smoke could cause more than 9,000 deaths yearly

Smoke particulates in wildfires could cause anywhere from 4,000 to 9,200 premature deaths every year according to a new study. Costs also range from $36 billion to $82 billion. Using satellite wildfire emission and air quality from 2012 to 2014, scientists determined California, Florida, Texas, Georgia, Alabama, and North Carolina are likely to have the highest number of premature deaths associated with wildfires.

First AI generated drug enters human trials

An AI-generated drug has entered human trials for the first time. The drug, referred to as INS018_055 for now, could be a light at the end of the tunnel for those with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). This rare and fatal lung disease has few treatments.The human trial period will last 12 weeks.

Your shopping cart may someday gauge your heart health

Grocery cart handles were embedded with electrocardiogram (EKG) sensors in a new study looking to identify undiagnosed atrial fibrillation. In the study, the cart handles turned green if nothing was unusual and then turned red if something was wrong. Out of 2,100 shoppers, 59 were determined to have a-fib. Two thirds were people diagnosed for the first time. Atrial fibrillation often goes undetected until after a stroke.

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© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health