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Virginia paid $22 million for dead Medicare patients; Asian American doctors overrepresented and underpaid; Long COVID struggles last at least 2 years - Morning Medical Update

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The top news stories in primary care today.

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Virginia paid $22 million for dead Medicare patients

A recent federal audit found that Virginia’s Medicaid office accidentally paid out capitation payments on behalf of 12,000 dead patients from 2019 to 2021. The inspector general’s office is asking Virginia to refund $15.7 million. The state’s Medicaid office is currently working with officials to repay the debt.

Asian American doctors overrepresented and underpaid

Despite making up only 7% of the United States population, Asian Americans account for 20% of doctors. However, white doctors are four times more likely to be promoted and Black and brown doctors are twice as likely. “Working hard and having all kinds of accomplishments may get you into medical school or a faculty appointment, but it doesn’t get you into the C-suite,” Charles S. Day, a Taiwanese American orthopedic surgeon at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit said in an article.

Long COVID struggles last at least 2 years

A U.K. study shows that those who reported COVID symptoms for at least 12 weeks have a greater chance for cognitive problems. Research also shows that the longer the symptoms, the worse the cognition. The results of this study further prove that prevention and early intervention of COVID are vital.

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© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health