Survey: Private practice pays better than academic practice

April 23, 2010

From 1999 to 2009, compensation in academic practices continued to trail that in private practices, according to an MGMA survey.

From 1999 to 2009, compensation in academic practices continued to trail that in private practices, according to a member survey of academic practices released last month by the Medical Group Management Association.

Academic primary care physicians reported annual compensation of $158,218, while specialty care physicians reported compensation of $238,587, a difference of $80,369, according to the survey. Private practice averages for 2008 were $186,044 for primary care and $339,738 for specialty. (2009 compensation data for private practices were not yet available.) Since 2005, compensation for primary care providers in academic practice rose 16.9 percent.