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Man’s brain “fried” in heat Arizona heat wave; Viral caffeinated drink causes concern; Why superagers have a sharper memory - Morning Medical Update

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The top news stories in primary care today.

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Man’s brain “fried” in heat Arizona heat wave

After suffering massive burns during the Arizona heat wave, experts say a man’s brain was fried after his internal temperatures reached 107. He was reportedly slamming his head on a truck before passing out. This incident serves as a reminder to take necessary steps to avoid heat stroke. When it takes hold, “the brain's function becomes totally disarrayed and you have things like confusion, coma stupor, seizure activity, and even intracranial bleeding,” Ralph Riviello, professor and chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio said in an article.

Viral caffeinated drink causes concern

A new drink called Prime Energy is being marketed to children and causing concern. A single can contains 200 milligrams of caffeine. Kids between the ages of 12-18 are advised to take no more than 100 milligrams a day. Prime was launched in 2022 by internet celebrities Logan Paul and Briton KSI.

Why superagers have a sharper memory

Superagers, individuals in their 80’s with the brain function of someone 30 years younger, are found to have more grey matter volume in the medial temporal lobe, cholinergic forebrain, and motor thalamus. In other words, they are resistant to the aging process. The results are ‘consistent with reports of resilience to Alzheimer’s disease.’

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© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health