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Potential massive recall of acne medicine; a flu strain gone; ‘hypervaccinated’ – Morning Medical Update

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The top news stories in medicine today.

physician doctor hands with morning coffee: © kwanchaichaiudom - stock.adobe.com

© kwanchaichaiudom - stock.adobe.com

Benzene in skin care products

Benzoyl peroxide, the over-the-counter and prescription acne drug ubiquitous in American medicine cabinets, over time breaks down into the carcinogen benzene. Now an independent testing laboratory is asking the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to recall treatments. One expert said the development “will have profound ramifications on clinical practice” and communications with patients. Dermatology Times, a sister publication of Medical Economics, has details.

COVID-19 came in and out-fluenza

At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, people began staying home, wearing masks, washing their hands, and avoiding touching their eyes, noses and mouths. Those measures apparently worked to eliminate circulation of influenza B strains from the flu family tree called Yamagata, CNN reports.

Wait, how many shots?

A 62-year-old German man voluntarily received 217 COVID-19 vaccines over 29 months with no ill effects. He said he received them for “private reasons” – and authorities were suspicious he ran a scam to sell vaccine certificates to people who did not want to get the shots, according to The Guardian.

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Michael J. Barry, MD