AHA Recommends Physical Activity as a First-Line Treatment for Many Patients with Elevated Blood Pressure, Cholesterol

The Friday 5 from Practical Cardiology is a list composed by the Practical Cardiology editorial staff aimed at highlighting relevant coverage of news in cardiovascular medicine.

Every Friday, Practical Cardiology provides a curated list of 5 articles focused or related to a particular topic. This week, the Friday 5 from Practical Cardiology highlights the 5 most popular stories from the past week.


1. AHA Recommends Physical Activity as a First-Line Treatment for Many Patients with Elevated Blood Pressure, Cholesterol

The AHA has released a scientific statement highlighting the importance of prescribing physical activity as a first-line treatment in patient populations with elevated blood pressure or elevated cholesterol.


2. Pair of Trials Demonstrate Reveal LINQ's Ability to Improve Detection of Atrial Fibrillation

Simultaneously published in JAMA, the PER DIEM and STROKE-AF trials demonstrate the ability of Medtronic's insertable cardiac monitor, Reveal LlNQ, to improve detection of atrial fibrillation in patients with a history of stroke.

3. Cardiology Case Report: Tachycardia and Bradycardia

Check out the latest case report from Dr. Brady Pregerson. This case report features a man in his 50s presenting to the ED with palpitations. Can you determine the correct diagnosis?

4. Meta-Analysis Details CVD Risk After Thyroidectomy in Patients with Thyroid Cancer

Data from AACE 2021 suggests the risk of cardiovascular disease was 15% greater among patients with thyroid cancer who underwent thyroidectomy than the general population, but found no significant difference in risk of cardiac mortality and atrial fibrillation.


5. Women Who Experience Premature Menopause at Increased Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

An analysis of data from 10k women in the Lifetime Risk Pooling Project presented at EPI Lifestyle 2021 suggests premature menopause was associated with a 40% increase in risk of coronary heart disease.