• Revenue Cycle Management
  • COVID-19
  • Reimbursement
  • Diabetes Awareness Month
  • Risk Management
  • Patient Retention
  • Staffing
  • Medical Economics® 100th Anniversary
  • Coding and documentation
  • Business of Endocrinology
  • Telehealth
  • Physicians Financial News
  • Cybersecurity
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Locum Tenens, brought to you by LocumLife®
  • Weight Management
  • Business of Women's Health
  • Practice Efficiency
  • Finance and Wealth
  • EHRs
  • Remote Patient Monitoring
  • Sponsored Webinars
  • Medical Technology
  • Billing and collections
  • Acute Pain Management
  • Exclusive Content
  • Value-based Care
  • Business of Pediatrics
  • Concierge Medicine 2.0 by Castle Connolly Private Health Partners
  • Practice Growth
  • Concierge Medicine
  • Business of Cardiology
  • Implementing the Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Malpractice
  • Influenza
  • Sexual Health
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Technology
  • Legal and Policy
  • Money
  • Opinion
  • Vaccines
  • Practice Management
  • Patient Relations
  • Careers

Added sugars linked to measures of dyslipidemia

Article

Greater consumption of added sugars in foods is associated with cardiovascular risk factors including lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and higher triglyceride levels, according to new research.

JAMA. 2010;303:1490-1497. [April 21, 2010]

Greater consumption of added sugars in foods is associated with cardiovascular risk factors including lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and higher triglyceride levels, according to researchers at Emory University in Atlanta. They analyzed data from the 1999 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey on 6,113 adults. For participants consuming less than 5 percent of total energy as added sugars versus 25 percent or greater, adjusted mean HDL-C levels were 58.7 and 47.7 mg/dL, respectively, and geometric mean triglyceride levels were 105 and 114 mg/dL, respectively. In women, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were 116 and 123 mg/dL, respectively. A significant trend for LDL-C was not seen in men.

Related Videos
© drsampsondavis.com
© drsampsondavis.com
© drsampsondavis.com
© drsampsondavis.com
© drsampsondavis.com