Added sugars linked to measures of dyslipidemia

May 7, 2010

Greater consumption of added sugars in foods is associated with cardiovascular risk factors including lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and higher triglyceride levels, according to new research.

JAMA. 2010;303:1490-1497. [April 21, 2010]

Greater consumption of added sugars in foods is associated with cardiovascular risk factors including lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and higher triglyceride levels, according to researchers at Emory University in Atlanta. They analyzed data from the 1999 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey on 6,113 adults. For participants consuming less than 5 percent of total energy as added sugars versus 25 percent or greater, adjusted mean HDL-C levels were 58.7 and 47.7 mg/dL, respectively, and geometric mean triglyceride levels were 105 and 114 mg/dL, respectively. In women, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were 116 and 123 mg/dL, respectively. A significant trend for LDL-C was not seen in men.