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Unwashed pillowcases have more bacteria than toilet seats; States keep legalizing unpasteurized milk; Spinal cord injury could harm immune system; - Morning Medical Update

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The top news stories in primary care today.

doctor desk coffee © Alena Kryazheva - stock.adobe.com

© Alena Kryazheva - stock.adobe.com

Unwashed pillowcases have more bacteria than toilet seats

An unwashed pillowcase could have 3 million bacteria after one week, which is 17,000 times more than an average toilet seat, according to a new study. Experts advise pillowcases should be changed at least once a week. Bed sheets should be changed weekly.

More states legalize unpasteurized milk

Despite a public health warning, more states have legalized unpasteurized milk. Iowa is the latest state to permit sales from small producers to consumers. Other states like California and Pennsylvania permit sales in stores. “Raw milk increases chances of infection by 150 times,” Rep. Megan Srinivas, a Democrat and infectious disease physician told her colleagues on the Iowa House floor.

Spinal cord injury could harm immune system

Spinal cord injuries may trigger an immune deficiency according to a new study. Researchers discovered that monocytes were deactivated shortly after said injury, in addition to a decrease in antibodies. “The risk of developing an immune deficiency syndrome was greatest for patients with complete, higher-level injury, the fourth thoracic vertebra or above,” the study reads.

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© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health