• Revenue Cycle Management
  • COVID-19
  • Reimbursement
  • Diabetes Awareness Month
  • Risk Management
  • Patient Retention
  • Staffing
  • Medical Economics® 100th Anniversary
  • Coding and documentation
  • Business of Endocrinology
  • Telehealth
  • Physicians Financial News
  • Cybersecurity
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Locum Tenens, brought to you by LocumLife®
  • Weight Management
  • Business of Women's Health
  • Practice Efficiency
  • Finance and Wealth
  • EHRs
  • Remote Patient Monitoring
  • Sponsored Webinars
  • Medical Technology
  • Billing and collections
  • Acute Pain Management
  • Exclusive Content
  • Value-based Care
  • Business of Pediatrics
  • Concierge Medicine 2.0 by Castle Connolly Private Health Partners
  • Practice Growth
  • Concierge Medicine
  • Business of Cardiology
  • Implementing the Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Malpractice
  • Influenza
  • Sexual Health
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Technology
  • Legal and Policy
  • Money
  • Opinion
  • Vaccines
  • Practice Management
  • Patient Relations
  • Careers

Train a health coach to call plays for your hypertensive patients

Article

A new study at the University of California-San Francisco (UCSF) shows that a little health coaching can go a long way toward controlling hypertension.

A new study at the University of California-San Francisco (UCSF) shows that a little health coaching can go a long way toward controlling hypertension. In fact, the study saw an average 22 mm Hg drop in systolic blood pressure among a low-income minority population. But the lessons learned from the study apply to all primary care physicians, reports co-author Thomas Bodenheimer, MD. UCSF coaches reached out to their hypertensive patients through weekly telephone calls and delivered a dose of education on diet, medication adherence, monitoring, and follow-up on behavioral modification. And it worked. The coaches (all with undergraduate degrees) received 16 to 20 hours of training on hypertension, adherence, and facilitating lifestyle behavior changes. The study, published in the Annals of Family Medicine, suggests that you can use existing staff, with little training, to help manage patient outreach and save time.

Related Videos
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health