The Dead Sea: Where Dream Becomes Reality

The Dead Sea in Jordan may be too salty for sea or plant life, but it certainly draws other kinds of organisms, those of the human species. It is a magnet for people who believe in its healing properties and also for those that are just curious. It is worth a visit and, if possible, should be done in style.

The Dead Sea in Jordan may be too salty for sea or plant life, but it certainly draws other kinds of organisms, those of the human species. It is a magnet for people who believe in its healing properties and also for those that are just curious. It is worth a visit and, if possible, should be done in style.

This is because the magic of sitting on one’s own private veranda overlooking the Dead Sea at sunset cannot be overstated. My husband and I experienced this in April at the Movenpick Hotel located directly on its salty shore. The night was pleasantly warm with a gentle breeze and a hint of saline was in the air. The lights of Israel twinkled across from us as the sun fell in the sky. A resident cat even appeared to experience the enchantment.

Mud baths are a major attraction at the Dead Sea. An interested participant doesn’t even need to get a spa treatment to partake. All that is required is to take a dip in the sea and scoop up some of the bottom deposit, spread it all over and feel a tingle from the hyper-toxicity. Many interpret this sensation as therapeutic; t is thought to improve psoriasis. Whether it helps normal skin might be more problematic. I myself found the creams in the room containing the Dead Sea mud excessively drying.

Other than sunbathing, taking spa treatments and eating, there is little to do at the resorts in the area. The breakfast, included in the price of the room, was delicious, and the staff was courteous. As we left the dining hall, we were asked to fill out a form evaluating the staff, and that may have played into the fine reception and care that we received. Our dinner, too, was good, and the local wine surprisingly pleasing.

Though not an official attraction, I found the costumed gentleman who poured lemonade for guests as we entered the hotel entertaining. He wore an apparatus on his back that I can only imagine was originally for tea. As visitors arrived, he leaned over so that liquid flowed from the strapped container on his back to the glasses.

Though the beverage was refreshing, the weight of it in the large brass urn must have been uncomfortable. Nevertheless, the drink dispenser managed to smile.