Allergic rhinits: Key coding considerations

April 1, 2015

The current procedural terminology guidelines state that you should code signs and symptoms when a definitive diagnosis has not been confirmed. Therefore, you will need to document and code the signs and symptoms that a patient presents with at his/her visit. Common diagnosis codes for allergy-related signs and symptoms include those listed below.

The current procedural terminology guidelines state that you should code signs and symptoms when a definitive diagnosis has not been confirmed.

Therefore, you will need to document and code the signs and symptoms that a patient presents with at his/her visit. Common diagnosis codes for allergy-related signs and symptoms include those listed below. You should also assign the appropriate E-code(s) for any external causes that can be identified.

MORE ALLERGY COVERAGE: Patient management tips for allergic rhinitis

Before choosing the treatment that best suits your patient, there are several types of tests that can help determine what the patient is allergic to, including:

  • Antibody testing (86000-86063),

  • Challenge ingestion testing (95076-95079), and/or

  • Allergy tests (95004-95071).

After running one or more of these tests, you should be able to assign the definitive diagnosis(es). Those specific to allergies are listed elsewhere on the page. Keep in mind that once a definitive diagnosis has been confirmed, you should no longer bill the sign and/or symptom of that diagnosis.

NEXT PAGE: Symptom and condition codes chart for allergic rhinitis

 

 

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