2016 EHR Report

October 25, 2016

Physicians expect more from their electronic health records (EHRs). These systems were supposed to provide efficiency and troves of useful data, enabling doctors to manage patient populations and meet the demands of quality care. But EHRs are lacking in all of these areas.

Physicians expect more from their electronic health records (EHRs). These systems were supposed to provide efficiency and troves of useful data, enabling doctors to manage patient populations and meet the demands of quality care. But EHRs are lacking in all of these areas.

 

Read last year's EHR Report Card here

 

For the fourth year, Medical Economics has asked physicians to rate and review their EHRs. The goal this year is to provide our readers with insight into how EHRs are performing and how physicians are coping with the challenges of this technology.

For our exclusive report, we surveyed  more than 2,000 physicians to learn what they think of their EHRs, and how the technology affects the condition of their practices. Our data show that doctors remain largely dissatisfied with the systems they have purchased. Said one physician respondent: “EHRs are not designed with the doctor or patient in mind. They are mostly data collection for someone else.”

Despite these frustrations, surprisingly few physicians say they are inclined to switch their systems. Our data show: 

• Just over half of physicians surveyed (53%) say they would recommend their current EHR to a colleague.

• Despite this, only 15% of respondents said they were considering switching EHR systems in the next year.

• The main reasons physicians said they would not recommend their system to a colleague were: lack of concern for the physician’s time in resolving problems and the system’s failure to meet the practice’s current needs.

• A majority of physicians (54%) have used only one EHR system.

• About 60% of doctors say their EHR has either had no effect on the care they provide (23%) or detracted from the care they provide to some extent (37%).

• Physicians are asking EHR vendors to improve their products in some clear ways: they want an improved ability to customize the technology to fit their specific needs; they need better technical and customer support from vendors; and they require better tools for measuring quality metric performance.

In addition to our exclusive survey data, Medical Economics has created a content package (see below) that offers readers the solutions and physician perspectives they need to better handle the challenges of health information technology. Our cover story explores the challenges of switching EHRs and transferring data. We have important coverage of Medicare payment reform, and how the government’s EHR incentive program will be changing next year. Additional articles discuss the challenges of interoperability and data security. 

 

Reports

Data security: With hacking on the rise, physician records are at risk

Switching EHRs: The challenge of switching EHRs

The next Meaningful Use: Will your system be ready for EHRs and Medicare reform?

Interoperability stalled: EHR's interoperability's uncertain future