• Revenue Cycle Management
  • COVID-19
  • Reimbursement
  • Diabetes Awareness Month
  • Risk Management
  • Patient Retention
  • Staffing
  • Medical Economics® 100th Anniversary
  • Coding and documentation
  • Business of Endocrinology
  • Telehealth
  • Physicians Financial News
  • Cybersecurity
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Locum Tenens, brought to you by LocumLife®
  • Weight Management
  • Business of Women's Health
  • Practice Efficiency
  • Finance and Wealth
  • EHRs
  • Remote Patient Monitoring
  • Sponsored Webinars
  • Medical Technology
  • Billing and collections
  • Acute Pain Management
  • Exclusive Content
  • Value-based Care
  • Business of Pediatrics
  • Concierge Medicine 2.0 by Castle Connolly Private Health Partners
  • Practice Growth
  • Concierge Medicine
  • Business of Cardiology
  • Implementing the Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Malpractice
  • Influenza
  • Sexual Health
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Technology
  • Legal and Policy
  • Money
  • Opinion
  • Vaccines
  • Practice Management
  • Patient Relations
  • Careers

Where's the national health information network?

Article

A year ago, there was a lot of talk about building a national health information network that would connect information systems of healthcare providers all over the country. The Commission on Systemic Interoperability (CSI), a body that advises Congress, issued 14 commendations for establishing such a network.

A year ago, there was a lot of talk about building a national health information network that would connect information systems of healthcare providers all over the country. The Commission on Systemic Interoperability (CSI), a body that advises Congress, issued 14 recommendations for establishing such a network.

Recently, the National Alliance for Health Information Technology, whose president, Scott Wallace, chairs CSI, put out a "progress report" showing that there's been little progress on interoperability (Health Data Management, Oct. 31). While HHS has acted to a limited extent on eight of CSI's recommendations, Congress has failed to pass legislation that would implement such proposals as financial incentives for the adoption of standards-based IT, says Wallace's group. Private payers have also failed to provide similar incentives, adds NAHIT.

Meanwhile, the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics recently approved a draft of minimum functional requirements for the national health information network. Intended as a set of guidelines for government action, the draft addresses privacy, certification, communications, data storage, data transactions, location of health data, transport standards, and patient identification (Healthcare IT News, Oct. 30).

Related Videos
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health