Webinar: When COVID-19 and the flu meet

September 10, 2020

A trio of experts will discuss how to battle dual epidemics.

As Fall approaches and the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic drags on, physicians are beginning to consider how best to battle the public health emergency and the upcoming flu epidemic.

What are the interactions between the seasonal flu virus and COVID-19? How can physicians manage co-infections? Dow do physicians prioritize testing and diagnosis? What are some effective strategies for expanding vaccine coverage?

MJH Life Sciences will bring three experts together in an effort to answer these questions at 6 p.m. EDT on Sept. 15, for a one-hour discussion on the best way to tackle the dual epidemics as part of the free inaugural COVID-19 Coalition webinar event “Battling Dual Threats: Flu and COVID-19 Converge.

You can sign up for the event here.

The MJH Life Sciences COVID-19 Coalition springs from MJH’s mission to improve quality of life through healthcare communications, education, and research. It was formed to help keep healthcare professionals up-to-date and informed on the science and latest learnings on COVID-19.

The speakers for this webinar will be:

  • Moderator Angela Rasmussen, PhD, is a virologist studying host responses to infection by combining classical virology with a modern systems biology approaches. Her research focuses on identifying host response signatures predictive of infection severity or disease outcome and host pathways to target drug development or repurposing.
  • Panelist Juliet Morrison, PhD, an assistant professor at the University of California Riverside whose research combines immunological and virological methods of computational analysis to address questions at the host-pathogen interface. One of her major interests is understanding how emerging and re-emerging viruses antagonize innate immune pathways to promote their replication.
  • Panelist Andreas Handel, PhD, an associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics in the College of Public Health at the University of Georgia. His research focuses on analyzing and modeling the spread and control of infectious diseases, mainly influenza, tuberculosis, and norovirus.