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Team pharmacists improve outcomes

Article

Adding pharmacists to the primary care team in the office may help patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes better manage associated risks, according to a new study.

Adding pharmacists to the primary care team in the office may help patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes better manage associated risks, according to a study by University of Alberta researchers.

The blood pressure of patients with type 2 diabetes dropped when pharmacists were included in the on-site clinical examination and consulting process, according to Scot Simpson, PharmD, associate professor in the university's pharmaceutical sciences school and lead author of the study. Among 153 patients whose hypertension was inadequately controlled at the beginning of the study, the 82 who received advice from a pharmacist were more likely to reach blood pressure treatment recommended targets.

The study also showed that with input from pharmacists, the predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease for patients with type 2 diabetes will drop by 3%.

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