• Revenue Cycle Management
  • COVID-19
  • Reimbursement
  • Diabetes Awareness Month
  • Risk Management
  • Patient Retention
  • Staffing
  • Medical Economics® 100th Anniversary
  • Coding and documentation
  • Business of Endocrinology
  • Telehealth
  • Physicians Financial News
  • Cybersecurity
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Locum Tenens, brought to you by LocumLife®
  • Weight Management
  • Business of Women's Health
  • Practice Efficiency
  • Finance and Wealth
  • EHRs
  • Remote Patient Monitoring
  • Sponsored Webinars
  • Medical Technology
  • Billing and collections
  • Acute Pain Management
  • Exclusive Content
  • Value-based Care
  • Business of Pediatrics
  • Concierge Medicine 2.0 by Castle Connolly Private Health Partners
  • Practice Growth
  • Concierge Medicine
  • Business of Cardiology
  • Implementing the Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Malpractice
  • Influenza
  • Sexual Health
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Technology
  • Legal and Policy
  • Money
  • Opinion
  • Vaccines
  • Practice Management
  • Patient Relations
  • Careers

Study: Intervention raises costs for diabetes

Article

Medical interventions for patients with type 2 diabetes won't reduce health costs over the long term, according to a recently published study, but that doesn't mean they don't offer benefits.

Medical interventions for patients with type 2 diabetes won't reduce health costs over the long term, according to a recently published study, but that doesn't mean they don't offer benefits.

Over the next 25 years, public and private payers would spend an additional $7 billion ensuring treatment adherence and preventing complications of type 2 diabetes compared with no intervention, say the authors of "Using Clinical Information to Project Federal Health Care Spending." The study was published last month in Health Affairs.

"Quality of life has some value to people, but [the Congressional Budget Office] has never attempted to assign a dollar value to that," says co-author Elbert Huang, MD, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago School of Medicine. Huang points out if the CBO or he and his co-authors considered quality of life and improved productivity due to the interventions, their projections would likely look quite different.

Related Videos
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health