• Revenue Cycle Management
  • COVID-19
  • Reimbursement
  • Diabetes Awareness Month
  • Risk Management
  • Patient Retention
  • Staffing
  • Medical Economics® 100th Anniversary
  • Coding and documentation
  • Business of Endocrinology
  • Telehealth
  • Physicians Financial News
  • Cybersecurity
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Locum Tenens, brought to you by LocumLife®
  • Weight Management
  • Business of Women's Health
  • Practice Efficiency
  • Finance and Wealth
  • EHRs
  • Remote Patient Monitoring
  • Sponsored Webinars
  • Medical Technology
  • Billing and collections
  • Acute Pain Management
  • Exclusive Content
  • Value-based Care
  • Business of Pediatrics
  • Concierge Medicine 2.0 by Castle Connolly Private Health Partners
  • Practice Growth
  • Concierge Medicine
  • Business of Cardiology
  • Implementing the Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Malpractice
  • Influenza
  • Sexual Health
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Technology
  • Legal and Policy
  • Money
  • Opinion
  • Vaccines
  • Practice Management
  • Patient Relations
  • Careers

Online appointments? Consumers yawn

Article

DoctorsDirect, a 5-month-old company that specializes in online appointment booking, has dropped its fee of $1.50-$2.00 per booking because not enough people use that service, says Tommy McGloin, the company's CEO. The former AOL and Mapquest executive has also found that physicians are hesitant to let patients book appointments online. While several other companies enable patients to request appointments through their websites or physician sites, McGloin has discovered that doctors don't want to relinquish control over scheduling to patients.

DoctorsDirect, a 5-month-old company that specializes in online appointment booking, has dropped its fee of $1.50-$2.00 per booking because not enough people use that service, says Tommy McGloin, the company's CEO. The former AOL and Mapquest executive has also found that physicians are hesitant to let patients book appointments online. While several other companies enable patients to request appointments through their websites or physician sites, McGloin has discovered that doctors don't want to relinquish control over scheduling to patients.

"Workflow is a big consideration for practices," he points out. "So even if consumers are demanding online appointment setting, or would like it, it will take some time before practices feel comfortable with adopting it."

A Harris Interactive survey last year showed that 75 percent of adults would like to make appointments online but only 4 percent did. In light of that finding, McGloin is surprised that most aren't willing to pay even a small fee for the privilege of not having to wait on the phone to speak with a receptionist.

DoctorsDirect, which is now trying to attract advertising revenue, has launched its service in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Boston and New York. Besides appointments, the company's website (www.doctorsdirect.com) offers detailed physician directories and forms patients can fill out before visits.

Related Videos
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health