• Revenue Cycle Management
  • COVID-19
  • Reimbursement
  • Diabetes Awareness Month
  • Risk Management
  • Patient Retention
  • Staffing
  • Medical Economics® 100th Anniversary
  • Coding and documentation
  • Business of Endocrinology
  • Telehealth
  • Physicians Financial News
  • Cybersecurity
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Locum Tenens, brought to you by LocumLife®
  • Weight Management
  • Business of Women's Health
  • Practice Efficiency
  • Finance and Wealth
  • EHRs
  • Remote Patient Monitoring
  • Sponsored Webinars
  • Medical Technology
  • Billing and collections
  • Acute Pain Management
  • Exclusive Content
  • Value-based Care
  • Business of Pediatrics
  • Concierge Medicine 2.0 by Castle Connolly Private Health Partners
  • Practice Growth
  • Concierge Medicine
  • Business of Cardiology
  • Implementing the Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Malpractice
  • Influenza
  • Sexual Health
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Technology
  • Legal and Policy
  • Money
  • Opinion
  • Vaccines
  • Practice Management
  • Patient Relations
  • Careers

New handheld diagnostic devices plug into EHR

Article

Medical devices and EHRs are getting closer and closer. An Austin, TX-based company, PracticeITprn, has just launched what it calls an "integrated diagnostic and software suite" for primary-care physicians.

Medical devices and EHRs are getting closer and closer. An Austin, TX-based company, PracticeITprn, has just launched what it calls an "integrated diagnostic and software suite" for primary-care physicians. This consists of a cluster of palm-sized diagnostic devices that can be carried from room to room and can exchange data wirelessly with a proprietary EHR. The initial offering includes an EKG, a spirometer, a blood pressure gauge, and a pulse oximeter (along with associated parts such as a spirometry breathing tube); a blood analyzer that can do HbA1c, electrolyte and other common studies is planned for later on.

"The EHR portion is presented on a tablet or a thin-client computer terminal, and the results will come up on the screen for the doctor," says company CEO Bob Teague, who used to be a practicing physician. The devices are FDA-approved, he notes, and PracticeITprn will help physicians conform with CLIA.

The company has a hybrid pricing model that combines monthly fees for EHR use, maintenance and support with a "fee-for-use" of the devices. Teague estimates the monthly cost would range from $400-$500 per practice, plus test fees ("under $1" each), to $2,000 for a high-volume practice (including the device fee-for-use).

"One of the value propositions we bring to the physician practice is the capability to improve its revenue stream," says Teague. "Most EHRs are just cost centers."

Related Videos
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health