Memo from the Editor

April 8, 2005

Winners

Two and a half weeks ago, Medical Economics won its second Jesse H. Neal National Business Journalism Award in as many years.

The entry: our seven-part series "Starting a Practice," ( http://www.memag.com/memag/article/articleList.jsp?categoryId=7147) which walked would-be physician-entrepreneurs through the steps they'd have to take before opening their doors. Senior Editors Bob Lowes, Dennis Murray, and Gail Garfinkel Weiss are the authors. Bob and Dennis wrote three of the articles, but it was Gail who was the heart and soul of the series. It was her idea, she wrote most of the installments, and she reviewed the other pieces to make sure they fit the structure, intent, and tone of the series.

We're very proud of this award. The Neals are the business press equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize. This year there were 1,168 entries in the competition. There are only 27 winners. To be one of those is an honor indeed.

Each of us on staff is committed to providing that service, to giving you the tools you need to run your practice efficiently and effectively, and to keeping the magazine a living entity-one that fosters back-and-forth communications with our readers and changes as your needs change.

Evidence of the communication is especially apparent in this issue: Not only will you find our regular report of the results of our Web poll ( http://www.memag.com/memag/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=154640) but you'll find the announcement of the winners of our Doctors' Writing Contest ( http://www.memag.com/memag/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=154650). Many of you have also received surveys from us recently-some asking about a recent issue, others asking you to provide the financial information that will form the basis of our Continuing Survey articles on income and hours. (Please fill those out and return them as soon as possible.)

As for changing to meet changing needs, next issue you'll find a new department, Outlook. In it, Senior Editor Wayne Guglielmo will explore events in healthcare policy, politics, and research-in Washington, among the states, and in influential think tanks-that will affect your practice lives. We'll be skeptical where skepticism is warranted, but above all, the column will strive to be smart, insightful, and more than occasionally witty. Not your boring, policy-wonk stuff.

Who knows, next year, maybe we'll win a Neal for Outlook! One thing is sure, we'll do everything in our power to make sure it fits all the criteria.