Medical Economics Weekly - FDA investigates medical apps

June 10, 2013

[VIDEO] Topics in this episode: Physicians replacing EHRs, smartphones can make you look old, the FDA looks into uChek app, more.

In this episode of Medical Economics Weekly, physicians want to replace their EHRs, smartphones may make you look prematurely old, the FDA is bothering medical app developers, emergency department staff spend too much time on Facebook, and more.

 

Below are links to the articles and social media activity mentioned in this episode. Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel for more episodes of our podcast. And make sure to connect with Kevin Stout and Brandon Glenn on Twitter (@kevinbstout and @BGlennWrites).

 

Beware Your Cell Phone! It Causes Wrinkles, Cosmetic Surgeons Say

According to the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, high smartphone usage can make you look prematurely old.

 

Nearly one-third of practices want to replace their EHRs, study finds

A small survey from a company called Software Advice found that 31% of physicians said they wanted to replace their EHRs.

 

Survey: 83 percent of doctors would use mobile EHR apps but don’t have access

A survey from Black Book Rankings is reporting that 83% of doctors would use EHR apps, but don't have access to them.

 

Study says emergency department staff's Facebook use is 'unacceptably high'

A new study in the Journal of Medical Internet Research raises the question of whether healthcare workers spend too much time on Facebook.

 

The FDA launches first inquiry into medical iPhone app

The FDA has launched its first investigation into an unregulated mobile medical app. The app in question, uChek,uses the smartphone's camera to perform urinalysis.

 

How medical schools consistently cover up their primary care failures

In an interview with Medical Economics, Andrew Morris-Singer, MD, of primary care advocacy group Primary Care Progress talks about the dean’s lie.

 

Facebook Comment of the Week

 

Dr. Rosemary Leitch replied to our question about a prediction of how ACOs will fare. She replied,

"I think they will flourish. I appreciate being part of an employed hospital group. I otherwise couldn't afford the Epic computer program."