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Liraglutide superior to sitagliptin for glycemic control

Article

In type 2 diabetes patients who have inadequate glycemic control on metformin therapy, liraglutide injections are well tolerated and are more effective than oral sitagliptin in reducing HbA1c, according to research.

The Lancet. 2010;375:1447-1456. [April 24, 2010]

In type 2 diabetes patients who have inadequate glycemic control on metformin therapy, liraglutide injections are well tolerated and are more effective than oral sitagliptin in reducing HbA1c, according to researchers from University of Vermont College of Medicine in Burlington. They conducted a 26-week parallel-group, open-label trial in which they randomly assigned participants with type 2 diabetes to receive 1.2 or 1.8 mg subcutaneous liraglutide or 100 mg oral sitagliptin once daily. Enrolled patients had all been on metformin at a dose of at least 1,500 mg/day for at least three months with suboptimal glycemic control. The researchers found that liraglutide reduced HbA1c by 1.50 and 1.24 percent, respectively, for the 1.8 and 1.2 mg dosages; sitagliptin reduced HbA1c by 0.90 percent.

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