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EHR scorecard: usage up, but hard core is small

Article

A review of studies of EHR penetration concludes that about a quarter of U.S. physicians are now using some kind of electronic health record in ambulatory settings (Health Affairs Web Exclusive, Oct. 11, 2006). However, the researchers from Harvard University and George Washington University point out that only 9 percent of physicians used EHR systems with advanced functions such as electronic prescribing. Furthermore, they cite a large disparity between adoption rates in large and small practices.

A review of studies of EHR penetration concludes that about a quarter of U.S. physicians are now using some kind of electronic health record in ambulatory settings (Health Affairs Web Exclusive, Oct. 11, 2006). However, the researchers from Harvard University and George Washington University point out that only 9 percent of physicians used EHR systems with advanced functions such as electronic prescribing. Furthermore, they cite a large disparity between adoption rates in large and small practices.

The researchers also found that the studies to date used different methodologies that varied in validity and often failed to define their terms well enough to instill confidence in the results.

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© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health