• Revenue Cycle Management
  • COVID-19
  • Reimbursement
  • Diabetes Awareness Month
  • Risk Management
  • Patient Retention
  • Staffing
  • Medical Economics® 100th Anniversary
  • Coding and documentation
  • Business of Endocrinology
  • Telehealth
  • Physicians Financial News
  • Cybersecurity
  • Cardiovascular Clinical Consult
  • Locum Tenens, brought to you by LocumLife®
  • Weight Management
  • Business of Women's Health
  • Practice Efficiency
  • Finance and Wealth
  • EHRs
  • Remote Patient Monitoring
  • Sponsored Webinars
  • Medical Technology
  • Billing and collections
  • Acute Pain Management
  • Exclusive Content
  • Value-based Care
  • Business of Pediatrics
  • Concierge Medicine 2.0 by Castle Connolly Private Health Partners
  • Practice Growth
  • Concierge Medicine
  • Business of Cardiology
  • Implementing the Topcon Ocular Telehealth Platform
  • Malpractice
  • Influenza
  • Sexual Health
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Technology
  • Legal and Policy
  • Money
  • Opinion
  • Vaccines
  • Practice Management
  • Patient Relations
  • Careers

E-prescribing volume expected to triple in 2008

Article

The number of new prescriptions and renewals electronically routed from clinicians to pharmacies will grow from 35 million in 2007 to an estimated 100 million in 2008.

The number of new prescriptions and renewals electronically routed from clinicians to pharmacies will grow from 35 million in 2007 to an estimated 100 million in 2008. It's a prediction from SureScripts, a company created by the pharmacy industry to connect its members with e-prescribers.

The anticipated surge in e-prescribing isn't surprising, given the federal push for this technology, the spread of electronic health records, and the growing number of pharmacies capable of receiving prescriptions digitally. However, e-prescriptions still represent only a sliver of all new prescriptions and renewals—2 percent in 2007, and an estimated 7 percent in 2008.

SureScripts defines e-prescribing as a computer-to-computer transmission, also known as electronic data interchange, or EDI. Consequently, the company's tally of e-prescriptions excludes those that are created by software and then delivered to the pharmacy as a print-out, a traditional fax, or a computer-generated fax.

There's also a wrinkle in SureScripts' calculation of all new prescriptions and renewals, which numbered 1.5 billion in 2007. The company doesn't count those for controlled substances, which can't be transmitted by EDI on orders of the federal Drug Enforcement Administration. That ban exists because the DEA has held that hard-copy prescriptions with hand-written signatures lessen the chance that controlled substances will get in the wrong hands.

Related Videos
© drsampsondavis.com
© drsampsondavis.com
Mike Bannon ©CSG Partners
Mike Bannon ©CSG Partners