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Doctors walk out; anger danger; improving men’s health – Morning Medical Update

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The top news stories in medicine today.

Doctor morning desk: © Alena Kryazheva – stock.adobe.com

© Alena Kryazheva – stock.adobe.com

Physicians on strike

Earlier this year reports came out about trainee doctors striking in South Korea due to poor work conditions. It’s still happening, small towns are bearing the worst of it, and apparently there are few signs the new physicians will return to work as the government plans to boost medical school admissions, according to Reuters.

A heart of anger

There are lots of things patients can do to maintain or improve heart health. Getting angry isn’t one of them. New research shows recurring feelings of anger can limit blood vessels’ ability to open. Given that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United State, anger management interventions might help.

Health and the man

Around the world, men tend to have shorter lives than women, and life expectancies have not grown as steadily as women’s in recent decades. Married men also tend to be healthier than single men. As health care resources become more limited, when is the best time in a man’s life to intervene for optimal health? There may not be a single easy answer, according to a new study and accompanying news release.

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© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
© National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health